Monday, August 19, 2013

Addiction recovery documentary: The Anonymous People by Guest Blogger: Lee Weber



By Lee Weber, Editor of Addiction Blog

OK.  There’s a new movie that you MUST SEE if you’re in recovery.  It will challenge your idea of what is means to reach the still suffering addict or alcoholic.  And will challenge you personally about your inner shame about addiction.  Why is it so compelling?  First, maybe you can relate to how I feel about addiction…

In the day-to-day drudge of sifting through information about addiction, I rarely get excited about the topic itself.  In fact, addiction can be quite depressing.  Even though I'm a woman in long-term recovery and haven't had a drink in over a decade...the topic of addiction feels heavy. So many people lost.  So many sponsees don’t make.  And on an on about addiction.  Do you understand what I’m talking about?But …then I saw The Anonymous People.I'm charged up!  In fact, I believe that this film is a game changer.  Even more, I would urge anyone in recovery to see it.  While the film may be more targeted to the 23 million people in long-term recovery, we can all benefit from it.  Family, friends, and supporters.

So what’s The Anonymous People about?At its core, The Anonymous People documents the Addiction Recovery Movement and the political history of how Americans view and treat addiction since the 1940’s.  And then, it calls us to action.And this is where it gets interesting.  The films urges us to view addiction advocacy as a part ofresponsible citizenship.  And that advocating for better addiction treatment, access to it, and the decriminalization of drug use can become a part of our own recovery.Then, the film addresses 12 step group principles of anonymity and reframes these principles in ways that make advocacy a natural fit.  At is most basic, we can speak in public as people in long-term recovery to change public perceptions, laws, and governance of addiction treatment… as long as we don’t mention the name of our 12 step group or program.

The film is currently being screening by request…but may make it to cinemas across the country if there is enough interest.  Crowd source and request a screening by going to the GATHR request page for The Anonymous People.  And then, let’s make history together!-----P.S. Just as a caution: the film’s call to action might overwhelm people just starting down the road tohappy destiny who should be focusing on their own recovery.Lee Weber is a writer, mother, and arts & crafts fanatic who writes about alcohol and drug addictiontreatment and evidence-based practices in the field of addiction.  Her current battle is with caffeineaddiction and a tendency to watch too much Magnum P.I.

http://addictionblog.org 
Lee WeberHead Shot.jpg.jpg

9 comments:

Daniel Driscoll said...

I will definitely check this out! I belong to a local Advocacy group in MA that are a watchdog for Legislature to make sure they do not try to take away addiction rights, programs, etc. I will bring it up at our next MORE Meeting
Daniel D

http://DriscollsRecoveryJewelry.com

http://youtu.be/WEr42oRShcw

Anonymous said...

I have seen The Anonymous People twice now. Highly recommend it to the recovery community, the general population, and especially those who would just like to be better informed on what needs to happen to make more of a positive impact on treatment and resources for the disease of addiction. We do have an epidemic in this country. It's time to step up to the plate and create changes. Otherwise, more people will continue to die. We don't want that!

If anyone wants to find out more about this documentary they can google "The Anonymous People" to easily find more information. It will be worth your while for sure.

Adam said...

I will definitely be putting this on the must see list for both myself and my son, who is in the early stages of recovery from prescription pill addiction. Thanks so much for posting!

Morgan said...

I've seen the trailer for this film but have yet to see that actual movie. The trailer alone is incredible and ever since I've been dying to see the movie. This review just solidifies my need to see it! Thanks for helping get the word out there!

Larry Dozier said...

It's really cool that good recovery films are beginning to come out. It's been a long dry spell since the seventies. Most of the recovery videos in treatment centers still have people wearing bell bottems LOL

NotThatKindofGirl said...

Hi Sobriety Girl! I'm Karma, a NotThatKindofGirl working to advocate on behalf of abused women & men.

I'm really happy that I found you, and I would like it so much if you could support me as I will you in your recovery!

Great post! I can't wait to check this documentary out, thanks to you!

You can find me at www.notthatkindofgirl.com. I got you on my feedburner and I'm looking forward to coming back tommorrow!

xoxo Karma

NotThatKindofGirl said...

Hi Sobriety Girl!

Thanks so much for this info! I'm gonna check this documentary out tonight!

My name is Karma, and I'm a NotThatKindofGirl! I'm recovering myself and becoming an advocate for abused women, as I was one for 8 years and lost 1/3 of my lower lip in an incident that forever changed my life!

I was wondering if you would like to support me in my recovery, as I will in yours? Looking forward to hearing from you!

Karma xoxo

Nancy Jorden said...

This has been a great blog about recovery. It is hard to go through things when it is a life changing event.

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